What does Ohio State mean to students like Jason Marion?

What does Ohio State mean to students like Jason Marion?

A chorus of excited chatter and nervous giggles ripples through the 30 pre-teens clustered at the water’s edge for a workshop. “I’m not scared, I’m not scared,” one boy declares as the kids crowd around a basin of water collected from the lake, which is squirming with insects and other aquatic life. “Look at those little red things,” exclaims a girl, fascinated. “What are those red things?”

Workshop leader and doctoral student, Jason Marion, knows from experience that nature’s laboratory--the outdoors--is the best way to spark a student’s interest in science. The son of a dam operator in the small village of Batavia, Ohio, Jason spent much of his childhood around water and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers rangers. As a Junior Ranger, he knew water was his passion.

This interest drew Jason to Ohio State’s College of Public Health to pursue his PhD. There, he received a fellowship that allowed him to research his first love: Ohio’s lakes and bodies of water--a love Jason was happy to share in a summer science workshop for urban public school students. “Some people are really responsive to hands-on learning--students who, historically, might not be interested if it was on a paper in front of them.”

As a recipient of scholarships and grants that have allowed Jason to not only attend college but to thrive in a field he loves, he’s happy to help others find their paths, too. “If I can help three or four of those students learn to love science, then that’s pretty good. People helped me out. Why shouldn’t I help these kids?”

Learn more

College of Public Health

REASONS TO SAY “THANK YOU!”

The But for Ohio State campaign is a $2.5 billion fundraising endeavor that invites those who believe in Ohio State to invest in our students, our faculty, and our potential.

*Gifts through June 30, 2014

“FOUR OF THE GREATEST YEARS OF MY LIFE! OHIO STATE ENABLED ME IN MY CAREER, IN MY MARRIAGE (I MET MY HUSBAND THERE), AND EDUCATED ALL FOUR OF OUR CHILDREN AND A GRANDSON! GO BUCKS!”

—Rolinda Barnett Schneiderman ’55