Ohio State Impact

Alana Gray

Alana Gray
Alana Gray

Year: Graduated spring 2012
Major: Electrical and Computer Engineering
Hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

Background
Alana Gray sought a university with both strong athletics and academics. And she knew she wanted a school located in a city, not a college town. Add to that list: a college far enough from home that she could grow and become independent. “I appreciated that Ohio State was renowned for a student population from different countries, backgrounds, faiths, and cultures,” she said.

Scholarships
“I have not had to stress over finances while in school, and I am so thankful and blessed to leave college with few loans,” Gray said of her five years of track-and-field scholarships. Originally, the track and field program offered to cover 80 percent of tuition, books, and room and board. She was heading to school in another state when Ohio State let her know more scholarship funds had become available, increasing her scholarship and making Ohio State affordable. “I knew in that moment that it was destiny for me to be a Buckeye,” she said.

What Ohio State means to me
“Being a Buckeye means growth and opportunity,” Gray said. “If you take advantage of the moment and time, there’s a friend, a club or organization, or an opportunity for everyone here at Ohio State.”

Costs of an electrical engineering education
Electrical engineering students pay for 24/7 access to certain computer labs. Costs also include breadboards for creating prototypes of electric circuits, a variety of computer programs, and graphing calculators. Different courses may require students to build projects and design posters. Other items to buy include books, course notebooks for classes and labs, and safety goggles.

REASONS TO SAY “THANK YOU!”

The But for Ohio State campaign is a $2.5 billion fundraising endeavor that invites those who believe in Ohio State to invest in our students, our faculty, and our potential.

*Gifts through August 31, 2014

“BUT FOR OHIO STATE AND THE EDUCATION I RECEIVED, I NEVER WOULD HAVE STARTED MY BUSINESS.”

—Leslie Wexner ’59