8-29-2003

Contact: Amy Murray, (614) 292-8385

Ohio State honors four at summer 2003 commencement

Battelle CEO will address students

COLUMBUS – Four individuals will be honored at The Ohio State University’s summer 2003 commencement for their contributions to society and academics, and their dedication to the university. Ceremonies begin at 9:30 a.m. Friday (8/29) at the Jerome Schottenstein Center.

Honorary doctorates will be presented to William Francis Ganong, a pioneer in the field of
neuroendocrinology; and Dennis J. Greenland, an internationally renowned soil scientist.
Distinguished Service Awards will be presented to two Ohio State alumni who have worked tirelessly on behalf of the university and the Alumni Association: Kenneth L. Coleman, founder, chair and CEO of ITM Software; and Ralph A. Rockow, founder and president of Exodyne, Inc., of Phoenix.

COLUMBUS – Four individuals will be honored at The Ohio State University’s summer 2003 commencement for their contributions to society and academics, and their dedication to the university. Ceremonies begin at 9:30 a.m. Friday (8/29) at the Jerome Schottenstein Center.
Honorary doctorates will be presented to William Francis Ganong, a pioneer in the field of
neuroendocrinology; and Dennis J. Greenland, an internationally renowned soil scientist.
Distinguished Service Awards will be presented to two Ohio State alumni who have worked tirelessly on behalf of the university and the Alumni Association: Kenneth L. Coleman, founder, chair and CEO of ITM Software; and Ralph A. Rockow, founder and president of Exodyne, Inc., of Phoenix.

William Francis Ganong, Doctor of Science
William Francis Ganong is the Lange Professor of Physiology Emeritus at the University of California, San Francisco. During a long and distinguished career as researcher and educator, Ganong has conducted an extraordinary number of important studies in endocrinology and neuroendocrinology. His book, Review of Medical Physiology, now in its 21st edition, is considered an essential reference for medical students throughout the world.

A native of Massachusetts, Ganong received his bachelor’s degree cum laude from Harvard University in 1946 and his M.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1949. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and the Korean War, receiving a combat zone promotion to captain in Korea, where he was one of six medical officers who set up the Hemorrhagic Fever Center.
After completing a research fellowship in medicine and surgery and serving as director of the Surgical Research Laboratory at Harvard, Ganong began his academic career in the Department of Physiology at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1955. He moved to the university’s San Francisco campus in 1958, where he remained until his 1991 retirement. He served as chair of the Department of Physiology from 1970 to 1987 and was named the Jack D. and DeLoris Lange Professor of Physiology in 1982.

Ganong’s scientific work has concentrated on the mechanisms by which the brain controls several different hormones, particularly those regulating body fluids and nutrients, reproduction, blood pressure and responses to stress. Since publishing his first research paper in 1952 in the New England Journal of Medicine, he has added more than 500 publications on renin, hypertension, and neuroendocrine physiology.

During his many years of professional service, he has served as president of the American Physiological Society and the Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology; as vice president of the International Society of Neuroendocrinology; as treasurer of the Society for Neuroscience; and, currently, as second vice president and treasurer of the board of trustees of the French Foundation for Medical Research and Education and secretary of the Emeritus Faculty Association at UC, San Francisco. Ganong is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and he has been a member of a number of editorial boards, including Endocrinology, the American Journal of Physiology and Journal of Applied Physiology, the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Neuroscience and the Italian Journal of Physiological Science. He served as editor-in-chief of Neuroendocrinology from 1979 to 1984.

Dennis J. Greenland, Doctor of Science

An internationally renowned soil scientist, Dennis J. Greenland is currently the Honorary Visiting Professor at the University of Reading in England, where he served in the early 1970s as professor and head of the Department of Soil Science.

The scope of Greenland’s research and contributions to the field of soil science extends over nearly a half-century and four continents. After earning his master’s and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Oxford in 1954, he served as lecturer at the University of Ghana in West Africa, where he began studying the effects of cultivation on soil dynamics. His research led to the 1960 publication of The Soil Under Shifting Cultivation, considered a classic in the field. Then, as a researcher in soil science at the University of Adelaide, he worked in southern Australia identifying strategies for sustainable management of soil and water resources, especially in tropical climates. His research over the years has encompassed a wide range of topics, including the Green Revolution, rice production, efficient fertilizer use, soil structural stability, soil conditioners, soil organic matter effects and degradation of tropical soils.

In 1974, he was named director of research at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture in Nigeria. His service as a sought-after scientific administrator continued when he was named deputy director general of the prestigious International Rice Research Institute in Los Banos, Philippines. In 1987, he was named director of scientific services at the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau (CAB) International in England. He rejoined the University of Reading faculty in 1988.

Greenland has contributed more than 180 papers to scientific journals and written three books, including Cherish the Earth (1994) and The Sustainability of Rice Farming (1997). In addition, he has edited seven more volumes on soil management.

He has long served as a consultant to commercial, government, and United Nations agencies on tropical agricul-tural development and sustainability of farming practices.

He is currently a member of the Committee on International Programs and the Committee on Statutes and Structures of the International Society of Soil Science. He is a past president of the British Society of Soil Science and a past chair of the Scientific Advisory Panel of the Commonwealth Development Corporation, U.K. His many honors include fellowships in the Royal Society of London, U.K., the World Academy of Arts and Science and the Institute of Biology, U.K.

Kenneth L. Coleman, Distinguished Service Award

Kenneth L. Coleman is a founder, chair and CEO of ITM Software, an early-stage enterprise software company based in California and focusing on information technology in business. He retired in January 2002 as executive vice president of global sales, service and marketing for Silicon Graphics, Inc., (SGI), a $2.3 billion computer systems company, where he had been employed for 15 years. Prior to SGI, he held management positions at Activision and Hewlett-Packard.

Coleman’s ties with Silicon Valley and the information technology industry have been invaluable to Ohio State for more than two decades. A longtime member of the Fisher College of Business Dean’s Advisory Council, he, along with members of his SGI technical staff, helped design the college’s computer/communications network, which has received national recognition for its configuration and capabilities. Coleman also worked with the College of the Arts to provide equipment, technology and advice to students in the Advanced Computing Center of the Arts and Design.

An active alumnus since receiving his B.S. in business administration in 1965 and his M.B.A. in 1972 from Ohio State, he is a member of the Alumni Association Advisory Council, serving his second three-year term. As co-chair of the National Major Gift Committee in Northern California, he provided a number of opportunities for university leaders to meet with West Coast alumni, donors and friends to gain support for new and ongoing programs. He also served as chair of Ohio State’s 2000-01 Annual Fund. He has served as a mentor for numerous Ohio State students, helping them with career opportunities in information technology, and actively recruiting West Coast students to the university. He has worked with university administrators to help improve the campus climate for African American students.

Coleman is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Fisher College of Business Distinguished Alumni Award, the National Alliance of Black School Educators Living Legend Award, the American Leadership Forum of Silicon Valley Exemplary Leader Award, the One Hundred Black Men of Silicon Valley Lifetime Achievement Award, and instatement into the Silicon Valley Junior Achievement Business Hall of Fame.

Ralph A. Rockow, Distinguished Service Award

Ralph A. Rockow is founder and president of Exodyne, Inc., of Phoenix, where he oversees the operations of three wholly owned subsidiaries offering engineering and technical support services, training and educational services, and manufacturing and facilities management. His companies have more than 1,350 employees.

He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Ohio State and holds an Advanced Management College Certificate from Stanford University. Rockow has maintained close ties with his alma mater over the years through his volunteer efforts on behalf of the College of Engineering. He was instrumental in the formation of the Mechanical Engineering Alumni Society and is the recipient of the 1979 Distinguished Alumnus Award and the 1998 Benjamin G. Lamme Meritorious Achievement Medal—its highest award—from the College of Engineering.

Rockow has served as chair of the College of Engineering Industrial Advisory Committee and has been a member of the college’s Steering Committee and Committee for Tomorrow. He also served two terms as the Alumni Association Advisory Council’s representative to the university’s Office of Research. In 2001, he was elected to The Ohio State University Foundation Board of Directors. Rockow and his wife, Barbara, spearheaded a drive for alumni gifts to establish the Arizona Room in the Longaberger Alumni House, as well as establishing the Alumni House’s Rockow Board Room. He has actively supported the college’s Formula Lightning Electric Car Race Program and has endowed a scholarship honoring his former mechanical engineering professor, Marion Smith.

Prior to his current position, Rockow held a number of positions at Talley Industries from 1976 to 1982, including president of the government and technical products group. His previous positions include leadership roles at Dynamic Service, Inc., where he guided the company as it took a major role in advancing the state-of-the-art safety in automobiles, and as manager for Space Technology Laboratories at TRW, where he performed theoretical heat transfer analyses on the Titan, Atlas, and Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Programs. Rockow has written numerous technical papers, has participated in oral paper presentations, and has led panel discussions for key national technical societies. He is a member of numerous trade and community support organizations.

William Francis Ganong, Doctor of Science

William Francis Ganong is the Lange Professor of Physiology Emeritus at the University of California, San Francisco. During a long and distinguished career as researcher and educator, Ganong has conducted an extraordinary number of important studies in endocrinology and neuroendocrinology. His book, Review of Medical Physiology, now in its 21st edition, is considered an essential reference for medical students throughout the world.

A native of Massachusetts, Ganong received his bachelor’s degree cum laude from Harvard University in 1946 and his M.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Medical School in 1949. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and the Korean War, receiving a combat zone promotion to captain in Korea, where he was one of six medical officers who set up the Hemorrhagic Fever Center.
After completing a research fellowship in medicine and surgery and serving as director of the Surgical Research Laboratory at Harvard, Ganong began his academic career in the Department of Physiology at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1955. He moved to the university’s San Francisco campus in 1958, where he remained until his 1991 retirement. He served as chair of the Department of Physiology from 1970 to 1987 and was named the Jack D. and DeLoris Lange Professor of Physiology in 1982.

Ganong’s scientific work has concentrated on the mechanisms by which the brain controls several different hormones, particularly those regulating body fluids and nutrients, reproduction, blood pressure and responses to stress. Since publishing his first research paper in 1952 in the New England Journal of Medicine, he has added more than 500 publications on renin, hypertension, and neuroendocrine physiology.

During his many years of professional service, he has served as president of the American Physiological Society and the Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology; as vice president of the International Society of Neuroendocrinology; as treasurer of the Society for Neuroscience; and, currently, as second vice president and treasurer of the board of trustees of the French Foundation for Medical Research and Education and secretary of the Emeritus Faculty Association at UC, San Francisco. Ganong is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and he has been a member of a number of editorial boards, including Endocrinology, the American Journal of Physiology and Journal of Applied Physiology, the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Neuroscience and the Italian Journal of Physiological Science. He served as editor-in-chief of Neuroendocrinology from 1979 to 1984.

Dennis J. Greenland, Doctor of Science

An internationally renowned soil scientist, Dennis J. Greenland is currently the Honorary Visiting Professor at the University of Reading in England, where he served in the early 1970s as professor and head of the Department of Soil Science.

The scope of Greenland’s research and contributions to the field of soil science extends over nearly a half-century and four continents. After earning his master’s and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Oxford in 1954, he served as lecturer at the University of Ghana in West Africa, where he began studying the effects of cultivation on soil dynamics. His research led to the 1960 publication of The Soil Under Shifting Cultivation, considered a classic in the field. Then, as a researcher in soil science at the University of Adelaide, he worked in southern Australia identifying strategies for sustainable management of soil and water resources, especially in tropical climates. His research over the years has encompassed a wide range of topics, including the Green Revolution, rice production, efficient fertilizer use, soil structural stability, soil conditioners, soil organic matter effects and degradation of tropical soils.

In 1974, he was named director of research at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture in Nigeria. His service as a sought-after scientific administrator continued when he was named deputy director general of the prestigious International Rice Research Institute in Los Banos, Philippines. In 1987, he was named director of scientific services at the Commonwealth Agricultural Bureau (CAB) International in England. He rejoined the University of Reading faculty in 1988.

Greenland has contributed more than 180 papers to scientific journals and written three books, including Cherish the Earth (1994) and The Sustainability of Rice Farming (1997). In addition, he has edited seven more volumes on soil management.

He has long served as a consultant to commercial, government, and United Nations agencies on tropical agricul-tural development and sustainability of farming practices.

He is currently a member of the Committee on International Programs and the Committee on Statutes and Structures of the International Society of Soil Science. He is a past president of the British Society of Soil Science and a past chair of the Scientific Advisory Panel of the Commonwealth Development Corporation, U.K. His many honors include fellowships in the Royal Society of London, U.K., the World Academy of Arts and Science and the Institute of Biology, U.K.

Kenneth L. Coleman, Distinguished Service Award

Kenneth L. Coleman is a founder, chair and CEO of ITM Software, an early-stage enterprise software company based in California and focusing on information technology in business. He retired in January 2002 as executive vice president of global sales, service and marketing for Silicon Graphics, Inc., (SGI), a $2.3 billion computer systems company, where he had been employed for 15 years. Prior to SGI, he held management positions at Activision and Hewlett-Packard.

Coleman’s ties with Silicon Valley and the information technology industry have been invaluable to Ohio State for more than two decades. A longtime member of the Fisher College of Business Dean’s Advisory Council, he, along with members of his SGI technical staff, helped design the college’s computer/communications network, which has received national recognition for its configuration and capabilities. Coleman also worked with the College of the Arts to provide equipment, technology and advice to students in the Advanced Computing Center of the Arts and Design.

An active alumnus since receiving his B.S. in business administration in 1965 and his M.B.A. in 1972 from Ohio State, he is a member of the Alumni Association Advisory Council, serving his second three-year term. As co-chair of the National Major Gift Committee in Northern California, he provided a number of opportunities for university leaders to meet with West Coast alumni, donors and friends to gain support for new and ongoing programs. He also served as chair of Ohio State’s 2000-01 Annual Fund. He has served as a mentor for numerous Ohio State students, helping them with career opportunities in information technology, and actively recruiting West Coast students to the university. He has worked with university administrators to help improve the campus climate for African American students.

Coleman is the recipient of numerous honors, including the Fisher College of Business Distinguished Alumni Award, the National Alliance of Black School Educators Living Legend Award, the American Leadership Forum of Silicon Valley Exemplary Leader Award, the One Hundred Black Men of Silicon Valley Lifetime Achievement Award, and instatement into the Silicon Valley Junior Achievement Business Hall of Fame.

Ralph A. Rockow, Distinguished Service Award

Ralph A. Rockow is founder and president of Exodyne, Inc., of Phoenix, where he oversees the operations of three wholly owned subsidiaries offering engineering and technical support services, training and educational services, and manufacturing and facilities management. His companies have more than 1,350 employees.

He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering from Ohio State and holds an Advanced Management College Certificate from Stanford University. Rockow has maintained close ties with his alma mater over the years through his volunteer efforts on behalf of the College of Engineering. He was instrumental in the formation of the Mechanical Engineering Alumni Society and is the recipient of the 1979 Distinguished Alumnus Award and the 1998 Benjamin G. Lamme Meritorious Achievement Medal—its highest award—from the College of Engineering.

Rockow has served as chair of the College of Engineering Industrial Advisory Committee and has been a member of the college’s Steering Committee and Committee for Tomorrow. He also served two terms as the Alumni Association Advisory Council’s representative to the university’s Office of Research. In 2001, he was elected to The Ohio State University Foundation Board of Directors. Rockow and his wife, Barbara, spearheaded a drive for alumni gifts to establish the Arizona Room in the Longaberger Alumni House, as well as establishing the Alumni House’s Rockow Board Room. He has actively supported the college’s Formula Lightning Electric Car Race Program and has endowed a scholarship honoring his former mechanical engineering professor, Marion Smith.

Prior to his current position, Rockow held a number of positions at Talley Industries from 1976 to 1982, including president of the government and technical products group. His previous positions include leadership roles at Dynamic Service, Inc., where he guided the company as it took a major role in advancing the state-of-the-art safety in automobiles, and as manager for Space Technology Laboratories at TRW, where he performed theoretical heat transfer analyses on the Titan, Atlas, and Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Programs. Rockow has written numerous technical papers, has participated in oral paper presentations, and has led panel discussions for key national technical societies. He is a member of numerous trade and community support organizations.